Gregorian telescope

noun an early reflecting telescope in which light reflected from a concave elliptical secondary mirror passes through a hole in the primary mirror.
Origin
C18: named after the 17th-cent. Scottish mathematician James Gregory.

English new terms dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gregorian telescope — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gregorian telescope — Gregorian Gre*go ri*an, a. [NL. Gregorianus, fr. Gregorius Gregory, Gr. ?: cf. F. gr[ e]gorien.] Pertaining to, or originated by, some person named Gregory, especially one of the popes of that name. [1913 Webster] {Gregorian calendar}, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gregorian telescope — The Gregorian telescope is a type of reflecting telescope designed by Scottish mathematician and astronomer, James Gregory in the 17th century.He described the design in his 1663 publication Optica Promota (The Advance of Optics). Early attempts… …   Wikipedia

  • Gregorian telescope — a telescope similar in design to the Cassegrainian telescope but less widely used. [1755 65; named after James GREGORY; see IAN] * * * …   Universalium

  • Gregorian telescope — /grəˌgɔriən ˈtɛləskoʊp/ (say gruh.gawreeuhn teluhskohp) noun a telescope similar to the Cassegrainian telescope, but less common. {named after James Gregory, 1638–75, Scottish mathematician and astronomer} …   Australian English dictionary

  • Gregorian telescope — n. a reflecting telescope in which light reflected from a secondary mirror passes through a hole in a primary mirror. Etymology: J. Gregory, Sc. mathematician d. 1675, who devised it …   Useful english dictionary

  • Telescope — Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope carp — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope fish — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Telescope fly — Telescope Tel e*scope, n. [Gr. ? viewing afar, farseeing; ? far, far off + ? a watcher, akin to ? to view: cf. F. t[ e]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and { scope}.] An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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